How to Help Employees Handle a Cancer Diagnosis

A new guide helps employers provide the best possible experience for workers with cancer.
By: | August 24, 2018 • 2 min read

By the end of this year, an estimated 1,735,350 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S., with 609,640 people expected to die from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. In addition, it stands to reason that cancer in the workplace is among the toughest healthcare challenges affected employees face. According to the Northeast Business Group on Health, in fact, a cancer diagnosis ranks among the most complex workplace health issues.

“Fear is the single word we hear most often to describe people’s experience with cancer, and benefits leaders often face helping employees navigate this terrain,” says Candice Sherman, CEO of the New York City-based employer-led coalition. Sherman adds that employers equipped with a better understanding of the cancer experience can facilitate early intervention to achieve the best possible health outcomes and provide a caring experience for employees.

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To that end, NEBGH now offers a free guide, Improving the Cancer Patient Experience: Putting Employees at the Center of Your Cancer Benefits Strategy, designed to help HR and benefits leaders “organize, coordinate and provide the best possible experience” for employees and family members with cancer.

“We believe this guide will help employers create a more coordinated approach to providing benefits that revolves around the employee,” Sherman explains.

Among other strategies, the NEBGH guide provides employers with ideas about how to create what it calls a “huddle”—a command-center model that coordinates employee and family medical benefits, cost-effective and high-quality care, and social and emotional support. Following its football analogy, the huddle includes multiple industry stakeholders including health plans, second opinion and care navigation services, wellness coaches, and disability managers who can provide services and support for a cancer-stricken employee or family member.

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