Here’s How You Can Get the Skinny on HR Transformation

Three case studies will reveal how HR leaders are taking the function to the next level.
By: | August 23, 2019 • 2 min read
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From employee experience to data analytics, HR leaders have been hearing nonstop how important it is for the function to “transform” itself in order to stay ahead of the macrotrends rippling through today’s global economy. But what does transform actually mean, from a practical standpoint? At the upcoming HR Technology Conference, attendees will have the opportunity to learn—directly from fellow HR practitioners—what transformation actually involves, the opportunities it presents and lessons learned along the way.

The conference’s HR Transformation track will feature five breakout sessions, including the following three case studies:

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8 Principles to HCM Transformation: A Williams-Sonoma Study

Employees can’t be expected to greet change with enthusiasm when it’s hard for them to see a link to their organization’s overall strategy. Williams-Sonoma’s Phil Louridas, vice president of total rewards, will help conference-goers avoid this sort of scenario by explaining the 8 key principles to HCM transformation and how the consumer-retail company personalized them based on its business models. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how those principles can be utilized to achieve business agility and lead successful change initiatives at their own organizations.

How Zillow Group Uses Data to Drive a World-Class Culture

Are you struggling to figure out how to help your organization build and maintain a culture that attracts and keeps top talent? Zillow Group, a member of Fortune‘s 100 Best Companies to Work For, will explain how it’s used experience data to build culture and improve employee engagement amid rapid growth. Dan Spaulding, the company’s chief people officer, and Qualtrics’ Jay Choi will lead a discussion on how to create “breakthrough moments” to attract, engage and retain a world-class workforce.

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